How does Reverse Osmosis work?

Reverse osmosis uses a membrane that is semi-permeable, allowing pure water to pass through it, while rejecting the contaminants that are too large to pass through the tiny pores in the membrane.

Reverse Osmosis, or RO for short, is the opposite of the natural process by which moisture is taken up by living cells. Root cells of plants, for example, have special cell walls that allow water to pass through them. In reverse osmosis, water is forced against a membrane that is semi-permeable, allowing pure water to pass through it, while rejecting the contaminants that are too large to pass through the tiny pores in the membrane. Impurities are left behind and are rinsed away to a waste drain.

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